Field of Faith Devotion Week 07 - The Gospel to the Proud

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Field Focus:
Teams (Subject to change) will be set this week for the remainder of the season (Practice Plan).

Faith Focus: The Gospel to the Proud
Family Game: Cup Game (Game Point = Grab onto God’s word as you learn from today’s devotional)
Bible Verses: Mark 10:17-31
Memory Verse: (Proverbs 1:7 The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge. Fools despise wisdom and instruction.)

The primary virtue of humility is submission to God’s will. It is this reverential awe and submissive fear that is foundational for all spiritual wisdom and knowledge (Proverbs 1:7). It is the knowledge of our own spiritual poverty that leads us to a relationship with God. Understanding that we are not good enough to earn entrance into heaven on our merits but based on the merits of Jesus (Hebrews 10:11-14). Sinful pride stifles humility. It feeds the lie that we our good enough to get into heaven based on our merits and makes the things of God seem foolish (1 Corinthians 2:14). God hates this pride because it leads to destruction (Proverbs 16:18). To combat this pride we can look to God’s standard of goodness. That standard of goodness being God’s law. God’s law is a reflection of his perfection and are ultimately set to show us a need for His saving grace. In Mark 10:17-22, we see how Jesus uses the Law to share the Gospel to this proud man.

And as he was setting out on his journey, a man ran up and knelt before him and asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” 18 And Jesus said to him, “Why do you call me good? No one is good except God alone.

Jesus challenges this man’s view of who is good, and in doing this affirms that He (Jesus) is God – Because only God alone is good.

19 You know the commandments: ‘Do not murder, Do not commit adultery, Do not steal, Do not bear false witness, Do not defraud, Honor your father and mother.’”

Jesus gives him the standard of goodness – which Jesus came to fulfil (Matthew 5:17) and elevate to an impossible standard (Matthew 5:48).

20 And he said to him, “Teacher, all these I have kept from my youth.”

This is the pride that separates us from God. It blinds us by minimizing our violation of God’s Law and magnifies the self-righteous acts that we perform on a daily basis. This pride deceives us – allowing us to believe that we can present these self-righteous acts as a sign that we are virtuous and perfect.   

21 And Jesus, looking at him, loved him, and said to him, “You lack one thing: go, sell all that you have and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven; and come, follow me.” 22 Disheartened by the saying, he went away sorrowful, for he had great possessions.

The command Jesus gave to this man revealed that he has violated the first commandment. “You shall have no other gods before me” (Exodus 20:3). The rich young man’s rejection of a direct command from God (Jesus) demonstrated his love for money being greater than his love for God. The man’s response is the purpose of the law – to convict the proud of sin; so that conviction leads to repentance and believing that only Jesus can save us from sin (John 14:6).

Family Focus:
Hard to say and hard to hear. Telling people who are too proud to repent that they face eternal damnation is difficult, but saying it is one of the most loving things you can do. Talk to your kid(s) about how humility leads to a relationship with God and how pride separates us from Him.

Questions to Consider:
1)    What is God’s standard for who is good?
2)    Why do people deserve to go to heaven?
3)    Is morality subjective or objective?

Freddy Keiaho